STARTING 23 MAY

 

Jorge Pardo's exhibit may be visited until the festival 2016.

 

Open everyday from 10 a.m to 6 p.m

Late nights on Wednesdays until 9 p.m

Late nights during the festival on 23 - 24 May and 30 - 31 May until midnight.

 

21, rue de Metz

31000 Toulouse

Tel. 05 61 22 21 82

www.augustins.org

 

Metro Esquirol (Line A)


Map
Musee Les Augustins 

Credits : Franck Alix, Toulouse International Art Festival, 2013

Portrait of Jorge Pardo 

Salle des Colonnes, Musée des Augustins, Toulouse
Credits Photo Franck Alix, 2014, Toulouse International Art Festival

The Toulouse International Art Festival thanks his partners:
LABORATOIRES PIERRE FABRE
CERAMISOL
APPLICATIONS LASER DU SUD-OUEST
PORCELANOSA
CREATIONS
GALERIES LAFAYETTE
LA BANQUE POPULAIRE OCCITANE
FORAE
DECOCERAM
PAREXLANKO

 

Film produced by La Machine.

LA MACHINE supports the festival and brings  its vision by realising a series of documentaries about the artists programmed since 2013.

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Installation by Jorge Pardo at the Musée des Augustins in the frame of the Toulouse International Art Festival 

(2014)

 

© Studio Jorge Pardo

Photo: Nicolas Brasseur, Toulouse International Art Festival 2014

Built in the 13th century, the convent of the hermits of Saint Augustine became after the French Revolution one of France’s first public museums, after the Louvre. Today, thanks in part to revolutionary confiscations and the pillaging by Bonaparte and his armies in Italy, Flanders and Spain, it offers a fairly comprehensive panorama of European art since the Renaissance. It also has an outstanding ensemble of Romanesque capitals and sculptures saved from the destruction of the city’s cloisters, including the Daurade. The building was reworked in around 1832 and then in 1873 by Viollet-Le-Duc, so that almost nothing of the original convent remains.

Jorge Pardo was born in Havana (Cuba) in 1963. He lives and works in Merida, a town in the Yucatán (Mexico).
Nearby, he spent six years working on his Tecoh project, a structure/sculpture on the scale of a village. The project at Toulouse continues the concerns explored in his interventions at LACMA, Los Angeles, in 2008, at the Fundació Caixa in Barcelona in 2004 and at the DIA Foundation, New York, in 2000. He has also accomplished major projects at the Liverpool Biennial in 2004, the Turbinenhalle, Düsseldorf, in 2003, K21, Düsseldorf, in 2002, and Skulptur Projekt Münster in 97. Pardo has had numerous solo exhibitions in American and European museums.

The unique collection of 12th-century Romanesque capitals held at the Musée des Augustins is one of the great cultural treasures of Toulouse. Internationally renowned for his work at the frontiers of art, design and architecture, Jorge Pardo has been invited to rethink the display of this exceptional collection. His installation will remain in place until the 2016 festival.
 
By turns a painter, designer, architect and display specialist, Jorge Pardo made just about everything he lives with – the furniture, the lamps, his studio, his house. His intensely colourful work seems to flow continuously from one founding impulsion. For going on twenty years he has tirelessly rethought and questioned aesthetic categories and hierarchies, drawing on the ambiguity of a system in which art is constantly undermined and the functional nearly always de-habilitated.
With the collections of Romanesque art at the Musée des Augustins, as, earlier, with the pre-Columbian collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and the minimalist collections of the Fundació Caixa in Barcelona, what Pardo’s display highlights is the impossible neutrality of the museum setting. It reveals both what he defines as a “framing apparatus” and the complex tissue of interactions tying it to the works. This reflection on the role of the institution is rooted in the history of conceptual art, part of which was written by artists who were also his teachers, Michael Asher and Stephen Prina. But where the latter produced a discourse that was actively critical of the institution, Pardo simply sets up a series of shifts, substituting an open question for the political positions of the earlier generation – for example, by displaying his makeover of a standard boat (Untitled (Pleasure Boat, 2005) or, more recently, presenting a room as a giant, oblique sculpture in the middle of his New York gallery (Inert, 2014). Already, back in 1997, when the MoCA in Los Angeles offered him a solo show, Pardo persuaded the team at the museum to put it on in an external location, in a house he built specially for the occasion, 4166 Sea View Lane. This open sculpture could be explored by visitors for a period of five weeks, furnished with the artist’s works. When the show ended Pardo moved in with his family. Ten years later, at the MoCA in Miami, he brought domestic space inside the museum, which was divided up into several zones: Bedroom, Kitchen, Living Room, Dining Room, Garden, where beds, shelves, tables, lamps and banquettes designed by the artist jostled together, surrounded by printed documentation about the artist’s work stuck to the walls like wallpaper. These projects illustrate the levelling process applied by this artist in the field of aesthetics and his determination to contest the museum’s categorising power.

The Toulouse International Art Festival thanks his partners:
 
LABORATOIRES PIERRE FABRE
CERAMISOL
APPLICATIONS LASER DU SUD-OUEST
PORCELANOSA
CREATIONS
GALERIES LAFAYETTE
LA BANQUE POPULAIRE OCCITANE
FORAE
DECOCERAM
PAREXLANKO